Northbound and Notable – Tagged "readers" – Northbound Notebooks

Tagged "readers"


Master of the Month - C. S. Lewis

Posted by Rosalyn Fenton on

C S Lewis

Clive Staples Lewis / C. S. Lewis November 1898 - November 1963

"You can't get a cup of tea big enough or a book long enough to suit me". C. S. Lewis

Clive Staples Lewis or better known as C. S. Lewis is many things including an academic, a lay theologian, a medievalist, an essayist but most famous as a writer. Lewis wrote more than thirty books in differing genres making his works touch and inspire all across the world. Lewis was a committed Christian and even broadcasted discussions with his beliefs including 'Mere Christianity', 1941. Lewis had lost his faith during adolescence but his friend J. R. R. Tolkien encouraged him to join the church once more. They later created a literary group together at Oxford University called the Inklings. The Inklings wanted to appreciate and share their enthusiasm for narrative fiction and fantasy which then lead Lewis to begin his famous trilogy The Chronicles of Narnia, his bestselling works to date.  

lion

images are from billmuehlenberg.com and bookcoversandillustrations.blogspot.com

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Master of the Month - Oscar Wilde

Posted by Rosalyn Fenton on

Image from wikiquote.com

Oscar Wilde October 1854 - November 1900

"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars". Wilde, 1892

Oscar Wilde, probably one of the most flamboyant and witty poets to grace our pages did live quite a fulfilling life full of art lecturing, marriage and many notable awards for his works. This was until he had an affair with a younger man and was then arrested for 'gross indecency', this unfortunate  event lead to imprisonment, poverty then a lonely death.

Wilde's most famous works consist of The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890), his most questionable work at the time, it was shunned and deemed immoral by the Victorian public, but is now embraced and categorised as one of his best works. However, as a dramatist his satirical work was well received with such plays as Ideal Husband (1895), Lady Windermere's Fan (1892) and of course The Importance of Being Earnest (1895).

The Picture of Dorian Gray 

images are from wikiquote.com and abebooks.com

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Master of The Month - Roald Dahl

Posted by Rosalyn Fenton on

roalddahl.com

Roald Dahl September 1916 - November 1990

"if you have good thoughts they will shine out of your face like sunbeams and you will always look lovely". Dahl, 1980

Roald Dahl was a spy, an air force pilot, a chocolate tester and very successful children's author. Roald Dahl, named after the first Norwegian to make it to the South Pole, had a very bright future ahead of him, however that was shortly extinguished with the death of his sister and father. Wanting a good life for Dahl, his mother sent him to various boarding schools in hopes he would gain a good education. What Dahl didn't know at the time was that these experiences would inspire him later in life to write 'Charlie and the Chocolate Fcatory' (1964) and the autobiography-like book of 'Boy' (1984). Dahl's books are always charming with flair for the bizarre all wrapped up in dry British humour from the grotesque prank-loving husband and wife 'The Twits' (1980) to the spell-binding mystery of 'The Witches' (1983) Dahl created literature to suit and amuse all appetites.

roalddahl.com

The BFG, 1982, pictured above

All images from roalddahl.com and nutfreenerd.com

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Master of the Month - Mary Shelley

Posted by Rosalyn Fenton on

portrait of Mary Shelley

Mary Shelley August 1797 – February 1851

Mary Shelley, born Mary Wollstonecraft was a novelist most famous for her science fiction horror Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus, published in 1818 through her husband’s company. Shelley was born in Britain and grew up with an array of influences, including her father, a philosopher and political writer, and her mother, a famed feminist noted for The Vindication of The Rights Of Women (1792). However, many tragedies occurred in the Wollstonecraft household leading Shelley to become a step daughter to a mother she despised. Some of her siblings were sent away to be schooled whilst Shelley was never formally educated, she enjoyed drawing and writing her own stories as a pass timer but took every opportunity to learn and read as much as possible from her father’s extensive library.

Frankenstein (1818)

It was through her self-taught studies that she managed to publish her first poem ‘Mounseer Nongtongpaw’, 1807 through her fathers circles. Later in life, through adultery and misfortune Shelley escaped to Europe with her sister Jane and lover Percy Shelley. She wrote the six weeks of adventure as travel writing but were not published until much later due to her actions being considered immoral and dishonest. It wasn’t until Mr and Mrs Shelley visited some friends in Geneva, Switzerland that she started to craft the idea of Frankenstein, her most popular novel yet. She went on to write others including Mathilda (1820), The Last Man (1826), Lodore (1835) and many more. Her stories include internal and external battles amongst families and man, this is likely due to the troubled and confusing childhood she experienced whilst growing up.

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Book Crawl - London

Posted by Rosalyn Fenton on

Calling all book lovers and savvy travelers, have you ever fancied yourself a book crawl? This week we want to share some wonderful places to visit around the world - first stop London!

Other than the busy streets littered with cream tea cafes and local pubs London also offers some beautiful historical monuments and buildings, including libraries.

 

http://www.earthphotos.com/Countries/England/i-7dQTHX3/A

The National Art Library at the V&A Museum

Adorned with carefully carved pilasters and a huge roof light, the reading room is the perfect place to explore and indulge in the history of art and creation of drawing, sculpture and painting. This library also boasts a courtyard area for small picnics or to read your discovered treasure in the sunshine.

(image from earthphotos.com)

 

http://hackaday.com/2016/08/22/youre-overdue-for-a-visit-to-the-library/

Maughan Library

Just behind the Anglican church of St Dunstan-in-the-west is the Maughan Library. Though smaller than some libraries and only open to the public when there is an in-house exhibition,  the structure of this treasury oozes with grandeur; the circular formation and domed window make for a terrific experience if you ever desired to bathe in literature.

(image from hackaday.com)

http://yallabook.com/guide/en/show.php?nid=1224&bodleian-library

Bodleian Library

Though not strictly in London, the Bodleian Library is located in Oxford within the county of Oxfordshire. Home to the 'city of dreaming spires' coined by the poet Matthew Arnold the city pays homage to itself with quaint shops and England's oldest botanical garden - the perfect place for whimsical charms to be discovered. Nowadays, the Bodleian Library is most famous for being the set for the Hogwarts library in the Harry Potter films. But look to the ceiling and discover medallions carved in by the artists as credit to iconic figures of that day - take a private tour to avoid the mumbling crowds and discover the history to this gem.

(image from yallabook.com)

What libraries have you visited around the world? Comment below!

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